The report of the public inquiry into the infected blood scandal that rocked Britain will be published today.

In the 1970s and 1980s, around 30,000 people in the UK were treated with blood infected with HIV or Hepatitis C. Around 3,000 of these patients died.

The report looks at the HIV and hepatitis C infections of more than 30,000 hemophiliacs or people needing blood transfusions over two decades.

THE WORST TREATMENT DISASTER IN UK HISTORY

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The scandal has been described as the worst treatment disaster in the history of the UK Department of Health.

People treated between the 1970s and 1990s were exposed to contaminated blood when they were given "factor VIII" blood products.

Donated blood was not screened for HIV until 1986 and not tested for hepatitis C until 1991.

GOVERNMENT TO RESPOND

The government will submit a detailed response to the report later this week after Rishi Sunak issued a formal apology to the victims and their families.

The UK will spend more than £10 billion, or $12.70 billion, to compensate thousands of people who were treated with blood contaminated with HIV or hepatitis C in the 1970s and 1980s.

Editor: David Goodman