After the tragic accident, the OceanGate company ended its tours to the wreck and entered the investigation process. About a year after the accident, famous real estate billionaire Larry Connor announced that he would dive to the wreck of the Titanic in a submarine to prove that it was a safe journey. The famous billionaire used the description "gizmo" for the Titan submarine where the accident happened.

Last year, the Titan submarine, designed by the OceanGate company, was on the world's agenda after a tragic accident that resulted in the loss of five lives.

About a year after the Titan submarine exploded, the famous real estate billionaire Larry Connor announced that he would go to the wreck of the Titanic in a submarine to prove that it was a safe journey.

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A new submarine from Triton, a company that manufactures submarines, will take real estate investor Larry Connor and the company's CEO deep into the ocean to visit the iconic Titanic wreck.

HE CALLED TITAN A "DIME A DOZEN"

"You know, what we need to do is build a submarine that can dive repeatedly and safely to Titanic-level depths," Triton co-founder and CEO Patrick Lahey told The Wall Street Journal. I want to show the world that it can be done and that Titan is a gizmo."

"DETERRENT" EFFECT ON UNDERWATER TOURS

Lahey also said that the explosion of the submarine on its way to the wreck of the Titanic had a "chilling effect" on interest in Triton's vehicles.

While the explosion may have slowed exploration of the ocean's depths, the company's client, billionaire Connor, wanted to start a new project days after the OceanGate disaster.

"LIFE-CHANGING EXPERIENCE"

"I want to show people around the world that even though the ocean is extremely powerful, it can be wonderful, it can be enjoyable and it can be really life-changing if you go the right way," Connor said about his new exploration project.

OCANGATE'S TITAN DISASTER

The Titan submarine was designed to take tourists to the wreck of the Titanic under the North Atlantic Ocean.

It exploded during its descent, killing British entrepreneur Hamish Harding, Pakistani investor Shahzada Dawood and his son Suleman, French diver Paul-Henri Nargeolet and OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush.

The investigation into the explosion is still ongoing, but OceanGate's former Director of Marine Operations, David Lochridge, had raised safety concerns before the explosion.

In a lawsuit filed in 2018, Lochridge said he was fired for raising concerns about the design and testing of the hull.

OceanGate pledged to cooperate with the investigation and suspended operations following the explosion.

Editor: David Goodman